Contact | Advertising | Copyright & Disclaimer
Site map | About

Von Baumhauer Helicopter helicopter

- Advertisement -
Choose unit system:

Specifications Comment this helicopter
Picture Helicopter
General
Manufacturer Von Baumhauer
Type Helicopter
Introduced 1/1/1925
In production? No
Units produced 1
Price US $ 0.00
Dimensions
Overall Length 0 ft
Length 0 ft
Height 0 ft
Width 0 ft
   
   
Description The Dutch have played only a modest role in helicopter development. Nevertheless, Albert Gillis Von Baumhauwer, a Dutch mechanical engineer who studied aerodynamics in Germany, has earned his place in helicopter development history.

Von Baumhauwer began his professional life in 1924 when, encouraged by a contest run by the then British Aeronautical Agency, he started to develop a helicopter. This was at the time when the first proper working helicopter had not yet been built, although it was also the time when Pescara had produced a coaxial machine that demonstrated that flying helicopters was possible.

After a successful fund raising campaign, Von Baumhauwer began to build his new machine in 1925. Unfortunately, it was destroyed during its maiden flight at Soesterberg airport, although a second prototype did manage to hover for a short period of time.

Von Baumhauwer’s flying machine is not only interesting from a historical point of view; it also contained several technical novelties. The first thing worth mentioning is the sleek and aerodynamically effective main rotor blades. Most importantly, Von Baumhauwer had added a tail rotor at a time when almost every other helicopter was of the coaxial type. The purpose of the tail rotor was to counteract the torque induced by the main engine, and this solution is still used today on almost every helicopter, albeit not driven by a separate engine.

Von Baumhauwer continued his experiments at Schiphol airport, but on 29 August 1920, after many flights, the adventure ended when the machine lost one of its main rotor blades, causing it to crash so badly that it was beyond repair. The pilot at the time was Von Baumhauwer, but he was uninjured. This event marked the start of a long period in the Netherlands without any helicopter development activities. Indeed, it would take until 1958 before the NHI (“Nederlandse Helikopter Industrie”) developed the H3 Kolobri, which is still the only Dutch helicopter to reach the production phase.
Advertisement
Design features
  • Seperate engine driving tail rotor
  • Tricycle landing gear
  • Front mounted engine driving main rotor shaft
Description
The Dutch have played only a modest role in helicopter development. Nevertheless, Albert Gillis Von Baumhauwer, a Dutch mechanical engineer who studied aerodynamics in Germany, has earned his place in helicopter development history.

Von Baumhauwer began his professional life in 1924 when, encouraged by a contest run by the then British Aeronautical Agency, he started to develop a helicopter. This was at the time when the first proper working helicopter had not yet been built, although it was also the time when Pescara had produced a coaxial machine that demonstrated that flying helicopters was possible.

After a successful fund raising campaign, Von Baumhauwer began to build his new machine in 1925. Unfortunately, it was destroyed during its maiden flight at Soesterberg airport, although a second prototype did manage to hover for a short period of time.

Von Baumhauwer’s flying machine is not only interesting from a historical point of view; it also contained several technical novelties. The first thing worth mentioning is the sleek and aerodynamically effective main rotor blades. Most importantly, Von Baumhauwer had added a tail rotor at a time when almost every other helicopter was of the coaxial type. The purpose of the tail rotor was to counteract the torque induced by the main engine, and this solution is still used today on almost every helicopter, albeit not driven by a separate engine.

Von Baumhauwer continued his experiments at Schiphol airport, but on 29 August 1920, after many flights, the adventure ended when the machine lost one of its main rotor blades, causing it to crash so badly that it was beyond repair. The pilot at the time was Von Baumhauwer, but he was uninjured. This event marked the start of a long period in the Netherlands without any helicopter development activities. Indeed, it would take until 1958 before the NHI (“Nederlandse Helikopter Industrie”) developed the H3 Kolobri, which is still the only Dutch helicopter to reach the production phase.
- Advertisement -
Design features:
  • Seperate engine driving tail rotor
  • Tricycle landing gear
  • Front mounted engine driving main rotor shaft
Performance
Persons 0
Max. Range 0 mi
Cruise Speed 0 mph
Max. Speed 0 mph
Max. rate of Climb 0 ft/min
HOGE ceiling 0 ft
Service Ceiling 0 ft
Gross Weight 0 lb
Empty Weigt 0 lb
Useful Load 0 lb
Dynamic system
Fuel Capacity 0 gallons
Number of Engines 2
Engine Type Piston
Engine Code
Horse Power
Rotorhead Rigid
Number of rotorblades 2
Rotor Diameter 0 ft
Number of tail rotorblades 2
Tailrotor Diameter 0 ft
Blueprints & model
Manufacturer Website manufacturer..
- Advertisements -



Do you want to comment the Von Baumhauer Helicopter helicopter?

Log In |
|
|
|
or
|
|
|
|
|
(Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)

Name

Email

Enter the above code here:
Can't read? Try different words.


HeliStart is authored by Peter Goossens.


Best Sellers

1: (Book) Cyclic and Collective
2: (Book) Principles of Helicopter Flight
3: Microsoft FSX Steam Edition
4: Logitech Extreme 3D Pro Joystick
5: Saitek Pro Flight Rudder Pedals

[ Log In ]