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Kaman UH-2 Seasprite helicopter

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Specifications Comment this helicopter
Picture UH-2_Seasprite
General
Manufacturer Kaman
Type UH-2 Seasprite
Introduced 12/18/1962
In production? No
Units produced 88
Price US $ 0.00
Dimensions
Overall Length 52.2 ft
Length 40 ft
Height 13.5 ft
Width 0 ft
   
   
Description

The Kaman UH-2 Seasprite is a ship-based naval helicopter produced by the Kaman Aircraft Corporation.

The first production models were delivered in 1967, following the first prototype flight in 1967.

The Seasprite is the product of a design competition held by the US Navy in 1956. The original design called for a fast, ship-based utility helicopter, but in the 1970s anti-submarine capabilities were added to the base design in response to increased threat from enemy submarines. Surface threat capability was also included in these design changes, including the “over the horizon” targeting ability. UH-2s modified in this way were designated as SH-2.

This helicopter helps to extend the sensor range of its base ship, acting as the eyes and ears of the vessel, spotting a variety of threats that would otherwise be detected too late or not at all.

These helicopters were however used for a variety of roles, such as casualty transport, evacuation, gunnery observation, recon and supply drops.

The Seasprite featured a single-engine design, using a 1250 shaft horsepower GE T58-GE-8B turboshaft engine. However, 40 UH-2 variants were modified to accommodate two engines, doubling their power. This is a significant improvement for the safety and reliability of an overwater craft as well, which is exactly where the Seasprite operated most often.

This upgrade enabled those units to hit an airspeed of 130 knots and a range of 411 nautical miles.

The Seasprite has a long and proud operational history. The US Navy operated a fleet of over 200 units. It was in service to the US Navy from the 1960s until 2001, when the last units were retired. In the 1990s many surplus Seasprite were offered to foreign nations as a form of aid. Although countries such as Greece and Turkey said “no thank you”, many such as Egypt and Poland, were happy to take the agreeing helicopters for repurposing.

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Design features
  • Sealed hull in order to float in water
  • Retractable landing gear with fixed tail wheel
  • Servo flaps at the traling edge of the rotorblades control rotor blade pitch
Description

The Kaman UH-2 Seasprite is a ship-based naval helicopter produced by the Kaman Aircraft Corporation.

The first production models were delivered in 1967, following the first prototype flight in 1967.

The Seasprite is the product of a design competition held by the US Navy in 1956. The original design called for a fast, ship-based utility helicopter, but in the 1970s anti-submarine capabilities were added to the base design in response to increased threat from enemy submarines. Surface threat capability was also included in these design changes, including the “over the horizon” targeting ability. UH-2s modified in this way were designated as SH-2.

This helicopter helps to extend the sensor range of its base ship, acting as the eyes and ears of the vessel, spotting a variety of threats that would otherwise be detected too late or not at all.

These helicopters were however used for a variety of roles, such as casualty transport, evacuation, gunnery observation, recon and supply drops.

The Seasprite featured a single-engine design, using a 1250 shaft horsepower GE T58-GE-8B turboshaft engine. However, 40 UH-2 variants were modified to accommodate two engines, doubling their power. This is a significant improvement for the safety and reliability of an overwater craft as well, which is exactly where the Seasprite operated most often.

This upgrade enabled those units to hit an airspeed of 130 knots and a range of 411 nautical miles.

The Seasprite has a long and proud operational history. The US Navy operated a fleet of over 200 units. It was in service to the US Navy from the 1960s until 2001, when the last units were retired. In the 1990s many surplus Seasprite were offered to foreign nations as a form of aid. Although countries such as Greece and Turkey said “no thank you”, many such as Egypt and Poland, were happy to take the agreeing helicopters for repurposing.

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Design features:
  • Sealed hull in order to float in water
  • Retractable landing gear with fixed tail wheel
  • Servo flaps at the traling edge of the rotorblades control rotor blade pitch
Performance
Persons 8
Max. Range 670 mi
Cruise Speed 138 mph
Max. Speed 162 mph
Max. rate of Climb 0 ft/min
HOGE ceiling 0 ft
Service Ceiling 17400 ft
Gross Weight 10200 lb
Empty Weigt 6100 lb
Useful Load 4100 lb
Dynamic system
Fuel Capacity 276 gallons
Number of Engines 1
Engine Type Turbine
Engine Code General Electric T58-GE-8B
Horse Power 1525
Rotorhead
Number of rotorblades 4
Rotor Diameter 44 ft
Number of tail rotorblades 3
Tailrotor Diameter 0 ft
Blueprints & model
Manufacturer Website manufacturer..
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2 Comments

ItemInfoText
1  Stan Lanker

Wednesday, August 5, 2015 2:06 PM

I was a navy aviation electrician (AE) in HC-2 (Helicopter Combat Squadron 2) Lakehurst Naval Air station, New Jersey. While assigned to Det 11, USS Intrepid, Viet Nam 1966 I had to often change bulbs in the tail anti collision light. The pilots would always turn them off when not needed. So I asked them to try leaving the light on all the time, and I don't think I had to change another bulb! The high freq vibs in the tail rotor were breaking the brittle cold filaments, but when turned on, the filament was flexible. Saved me lots of trips up that high tail! I used to shiny up it, and hang on tight! Stan
2  helistartgz

Friday, August 7, 2015 7:14 AM

Thanks for sharing your nice story, Stan!

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