Contact | Advertising | Copyright & Disclaimer
Site map | About

Focke-Wulf Fw-61 helicopter

- Advertisement -
Choose unit system:

Specifications Comment this helicopter
Picture Fw-61
General
Manufacturer Focke-Wulf
Type Fw-61
Introduced 6/26/1936
In production? No
Units produced 2
Price US $ 0.00
Dimensions
Overall Length 0 ft
Length 23.9 ft
Height 8.6 ft
Width 0 ft
   
   
Description

The Focke-Wulf Fw 61 (aka Fa 61) was an experimental helicopter of supreme historical significance. The Fw 61 was built by Focke-Achgelis and designed by Professor Henrich Focke.

The Fw 61 is widely considered to be the first practical helicopter and first took flight on 26 June 1936. Prior to the creation of the Fw 61 Professor Focke had experimented with various autogyros, which are a type of precursor to modern helicopters and continue to be flown in parallel even today. His experience with autogyros made their limitations clear and in partnership with engineer Gerd Achgelis they produced a prototype aircraft powered by a small two-stroke engine that proved the feasibility if true helicopters.

Apart from the single radial engine the Fw 61 had two rotors in order to counter the torque effect produced by each. What we think of as conventional helicopter design today of course did not exist at the time. The tubular steel airframe was borrowed from a well-tested aircraft known as the Focke-Wulf Fw 44 Steiglitz. The rotors were set on steel outriggers and driven by a complex shaft and gear system. Interestingly, the small horizontal- axis propeller had nothing to do with propulsion and was simply a way to cool the engine while hovering or in low-speed flight.

In February 1938, the Fw 61 was demonstrated by Hanna Reitsch indoors at the Deutschlandhalle sports stadium in Berlin, Germany. It subsequently set several records for altitude, speed and flight duration culminating, in June 1938, with an altitude record of 3,427 m (11,243 ft), breaking the unofficial 605-meter altitude record of the TsAGI 1-EA from the Soviet Union set in August 1932, and a straight line flight record of 230 km (143 mi).

Only two units were ever built and they were primarily put to use by Nazi Germany. It is no accident that Germany enjoyed significant air supremacy for quite some time thanks to its advanced helicopter technology, no doubt directly as a result of the work by Focke and Achgelis.

Advertisement
Design features
  • Twin rotors, set on tubular-steel outriggers to the left and right of the fuselage
  • No need for tail rotor
  • Small horizontal-axis propeller for engine cooling purposes only
Description

The Focke-Wulf Fw 61 (aka Fa 61) was an experimental helicopter of supreme historical significance. The Fw 61 was built by Focke-Achgelis and designed by Professor Henrich Focke.

The Fw 61 is widely considered to be the first practical helicopter and first took flight on 26 June 1936. Prior to the creation of the Fw 61 Professor Focke had experimented with various autogyros, which are a type of precursor to modern helicopters and continue to be flown in parallel even today. His experience with autogyros made their limitations clear and in partnership with engineer Gerd Achgelis they produced a prototype aircraft powered by a small two-stroke engine that proved the feasibility if true helicopters.

Apart from the single radial engine the Fw 61 had two rotors in order to counter the torque effect produced by each. What we think of as conventional helicopter design today of course did not exist at the time. The tubular steel airframe was borrowed from a well-tested aircraft known as the Focke-Wulf Fw 44 Steiglitz. The rotors were set on steel outriggers and driven by a complex shaft and gear system. Interestingly, the small horizontal- axis propeller had nothing to do with propulsion and was simply a way to cool the engine while hovering or in low-speed flight.

In February 1938, the Fw 61 was demonstrated by Hanna Reitsch indoors at the Deutschlandhalle sports stadium in Berlin, Germany. It subsequently set several records for altitude, speed and flight duration culminating, in June 1938, with an altitude record of 3,427 m (11,243 ft), breaking the unofficial 605-meter altitude record of the TsAGI 1-EA from the Soviet Union set in August 1932, and a straight line flight record of 230 km (143 mi).

Only two units were ever built and they were primarily put to use by Nazi Germany. It is no accident that Germany enjoyed significant air supremacy for quite some time thanks to its advanced helicopter technology, no doubt directly as a result of the work by Focke and Achgelis.

- Advertisement -
Design features:
  • Twin rotors, set on tubular-steel outriggers to the left and right of the fuselage
  • No need for tail rotor
  • Small horizontal-axis propeller for engine cooling purposes only
Performance
Persons 1
Max. Range 143 mi
Cruise Speed 56 mph
Max. Speed 76 mph
Max. rate of Climb 690 ft/min
HOGE ceiling 0 ft
Service Ceiling 11240 ft
Gross Weight 2094 lb
Empty Weigt 1803 lb
Useful Load 291 lb
Dynamic system
Fuel Capacity 0 gallons
Number of Engines 1
Engine Type Piston
Engine Code Bramo Sh 14A
Horse Power 160
Rotorhead Dual rotors, fully articulated rotorheads
Number of rotorblades 2
Rotor Diameter 23 ft
Number of tail rotorblades 0
Tailrotor Diameter 0 ft
Blueprints & model
Manufacturer Website manufacturer..
- Advertisements -



Do you want to comment the Focke-Wulf Fw-61 helicopter?

Log In |
|
|
|
or
|
|
|
|
|
(Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)

Name

Email

Enter the above code here:
Can't read? Try different words.


HeliStart is authored by Peter Goossens.


Best Sellers

1: (Book) Cyclic and Collective
2: (Book) Principles of Helicopter Flight
3: Microsoft FSX Steam Edition
4: Logitech Extreme 3D Pro Joystick
5: Saitek Pro Flight Rudder Pedals

[ Log In ]