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Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey helicopter

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Specifications Comment this helicopter
Picture V-22_Osprey
General
Manufacturer Bell Boeing
Type V-22 Osprey
Introduced 6/13/2007
In production? Yes
Units produced 160
Price US $ 70,000,000.00
Dimensions
Overall Length 57.4 ft
Length 57.4 ft
Height 22.08 ft
Width 84.6 ft
   
   
Description The origin of the development of the V-22 Osprey can be traced back to the fatal Iran hostage rescue mission in 1980, as it was this event that led to the US DoD JVX (Joint-service Vertical Take-off/landing Experimental) program. At the end of 1982, a formal ‘Request for Proposals’ was issued, with only the consortium of Boeing and Bell responding by submitting a plan based on the Bell XV-15 tiltrotor concept. On 14 April 1983, the contract for a preliminary design was awarded to this consortium, and in 1985 the new tiltrotor model was given the designation V-22 Osprey.

The development process was a long and tedious affair, and it was more than two decades before the V-22 Osprey was introduced to the field. During this period, there were four crashes with 30 fatalities and the budget had to be raised several times, ultimately rising to the equivalent of 35 billion dollars today.

The tiltrotor concept is based on fixed wings to which two rotors are attached to the end points. Each rotor is powered by its own engine, which is also positioned at the end of the wing in a nacelle. The nacelle and the rotor as a unit can rotate between the horizontal (airplane mode) and vertical orientation (helicopter mode). During the latter, the aircraft is controlled by cyclic rotor control using a swashplate construction that is similar to a traditional helicopter. During the former, the plane uses ailerons like a conventional aircraft. During the transition between the two phases, both control systems work in collaboration. The V-22 uses a fly-by-wire system, where the flight computer controls the ailerons and the cyclic control system.

A tiltrotor has VTOL capabilities like a helicopter, but with much better speed and range specifications.

The two engines are interconnected, so that in the case of an engine failure, both rotors can be powered by one engine. The V-22 Osprey does not have autorotation capabilities.

The fatalities, long development time and the budget overruns caused considerable controversy during the project. However, with over 160 units produced and positive feedback from the field, the V-22 Osprey is here to stay.
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Design features
  • Fly-by-wire flight control system
  • Glass cockpit
  • Composites rotor blades
  • Engines connect to a central gearbox so that one engine can drive both rotors.
  • Swashplate cyclic control when nacelles point straight up.
  • Tricycle retractable landing gear
  • Large aft cargo ramp
  • Compact storage with rotors folded and wings aligned with the fuselage
Description
The origin of the development of the V-22 Osprey can be traced back to the fatal Iran hostage rescue mission in 1980, as it was this event that led to the US DoD JVX (Joint-service Vertical Take-off/landing Experimental) program. At the end of 1982, a formal ‘Request for Proposals’ was issued, with only the consortium of Boeing and Bell responding by submitting a plan based on the Bell XV-15 tiltrotor concept. On 14 April 1983, the contract for a preliminary design was awarded to this consortium, and in 1985 the new tiltrotor model was given the designation V-22 Osprey.

The development process was a long and tedious affair, and it was more than two decades before the V-22 Osprey was introduced to the field. During this period, there were four crashes with 30 fatalities and the budget had to be raised several times, ultimately rising to the equivalent of 35 billion dollars today.

The tiltrotor concept is based on fixed wings to which two rotors are attached to the end points. Each rotor is powered by its own engine, which is also positioned at the end of the wing in a nacelle. The nacelle and the rotor as a unit can rotate between the horizontal (airplane mode) and vertical orientation (helicopter mode). During the latter, the aircraft is controlled by cyclic rotor control using a swashplate construction that is similar to a traditional helicopter. During the former, the plane uses ailerons like a conventional aircraft. During the transition between the two phases, both control systems work in collaboration. The V-22 uses a fly-by-wire system, where the flight computer controls the ailerons and the cyclic control system.

A tiltrotor has VTOL capabilities like a helicopter, but with much better speed and range specifications.

The two engines are interconnected, so that in the case of an engine failure, both rotors can be powered by one engine. The V-22 Osprey does not have autorotation capabilities.

The fatalities, long development time and the budget overruns caused considerable controversy during the project. However, with over 160 units produced and positive feedback from the field, the V-22 Osprey is here to stay.
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Design features:
  • Fly-by-wire flight control system
  • Glass cockpit
  • Composites rotor blades
  • Engines connect to a central gearbox so that one engine can drive both rotors.
  • Swashplate cyclic control when nacelles point straight up.
  • Tricycle retractable landing gear
  • Large aft cargo ramp
  • Compact storage with rotors folded and wings aligned with the fuselage
Performance
Persons 28
Max. Range 1011 mi
Cruise Speed 277 mph
Max. Speed 316 mph
Max. rate of Climb 2320 ft/min
HOGE ceiling 0 ft
Service Ceiling 25000 ft
Gross Weight 60500 lb
Empty Weigt 33140 lb
Useful Load 27360 lb
Dynamic system
Fuel Capacity 0 gallons
Number of Engines 2
Engine Type Turbine
Engine Code Rolls-Royce Allison T406/AE 1107C-Liberty
Horse Power 6150
Rotorhead Tilt rotor system
Number of rotorblades 3
Rotor Diameter 38 ft
Number of tail rotorblades 0
Tailrotor Diameter 0 ft
Blueprints & model
Manufacturer Website manufacturer..
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